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General  
   

Avoiding Buried Utilities and Excavation Accidents  

 

MconneX video highlighting LIVE research in excavator pose monitoring for excavation safety.

 

"We live above a web of buried utility lines that make modern life possible. Michigan Engineers are developing a revolutionary method for excavator operators to avoid accidentally hitting buried utilities. Using a fast and highly cost effective computer vision system called Smart Dig, they have made incredible strides in creating safer, cheaper and more productive construction sites."   

   

Improving Bridge Safety 

 

Associate professors Jerome Lynch and Vineet Kamat aim to improve the safety and effectiveness of bridges through wireless sensor communication in their NIST project.

   

Visualization Research at LIVE (1999-2011)

 

This video presents a brief summary of research conducted by members of the University of Michigan Laboratory for Interactive Visualization in Engineering (LIVE) from 1999 to 2011.

   

Visualization of Engineering Graphics in Augmented Reality for Integrated and Automated Project Processes
 

FIATECH Tech Tuesday Webinar Series, May 2010

 
   
Robotics and Automation  
   

Robotic In-Situ Assembly On Unstructured Construction Sites
 

The depicted experiments use a single camera and a visual marker-based metrology to rapidly establish local reference frames and to detect staged building components. Based on the design of the structure being assembled, the algorithms automatically determine the assembly sequence. Implemented using a 7-axis KUKA KR100 robotic manipulator, the robotic system can successfully assemble various structures autonomously. This work will be presented at ISARC 2014.

   

Real-Time Visualization of Articulated Backhoe Loader
 

Articulated backhoe is instrumented with orientation sensors installed on the boom, stick, and bucket. The sensor data streams are connected to virtual backhoe counterparts inside a 3D world. Once the connections are established, the motion of the real backhoe can be concurrently visualized in 3D. The virtual world is then populated with georeferenced models of underground utilities for estimating proximity of the digging machine to utilities buried in its vicinity.

   
Augmented Reality  
   

Improving Construction Safety with Augmented Reality

 

MconneX video highlighting LIVE research in Augmented Reality visualization for excavation safety.

 

"Construction Engineers can now walk through an actual site and experience a facility as it may be built in the future, or look into the ground and see water, sewer, and gas pipes as they exist below the surface before they even start building.

 

The software that implements these registration algorithms and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

AR Visualization of Subsurface Utilities

 

This video demonstrates the georeferenced visualization of subsurface utilities in mobile AR. Miss Dig System, Inc. is the One-Call excavation safety contractor in Michigan. Current practices of excavation safety include identification of affected locations based on available plans and physical marking of expected utility locations on the ground surface with paint, stakes, and flags. This video demonstrates a proposed AR based utility location and digital marking procedure for improved excavation safety. 

 

The software that implements these registration algorithms and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

Outdoor AR Visual Simulations with Occlusion

 

This video makes a comparison between occlusion-disabled and occlusion-enabled AR visual simulation in an outdoor loading zone environment. A construction worker is standing on a virtual scissor lift and painting the wall. She then jumps off the scissor lift, pushes the debris to the virtual pile of dirt with a physical shovel and operates the virtual "bobcat" scale excavator.

 

The software that implements these occlusion algorithms and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

Indoor AR Visual Simulations with Occlusion

 

This video makes a comparison between occlusion-disabled and occlusion-enabled AR visual simulation in an indoor structural lab environment. A forklift picks up a virtual box in front of the virtual stack, and maneuvers to put it on top of a physical box. In the meantime, a construction worker passes by with a buggy, and then puts a physical bottle besides the virtual box.

 

The software that implements these occlusion algorithms and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   
 

ARVita - Tabletop Augmented Reality Demonstration
 

 

ARVita is an acronym for Augmented Reality Vitascope. ARVita takes advantage of the Add-On Application Programming Interface (API) provided by Vitascope, and its basic set of animation scripting statements to visualize simulated operations in a fiducial marker based tabletop Augmented Reality environment. ARVita allows multiple users wearing Head-Mounted Displays and sitting across a table to collaboratively observe and interact with visual simulations of engineering processes.

 

The software and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

KEG Tracker - Tabletop Augmented Reality using Natural Markers
 

 

This video demonstrates the KEG tracker developed in our lab for estimating a camera's position and orientation for a general class of mobile context-aware applications. The algorithm integrates two classic natural marker-based registration algorithms, Homography-from-detection and Homography-from-tracking, and overcomes their specific limitations of jitter and drift by applying two global constraints (geometric and appearance) to prevent tracking errors from propagating between consecutive frames. The tracking algorithm achieves an increase in both stability and accuracy, while being fast enough for real-time applications.

 

 

The software and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

Real Time Augmented Reality Animation - ARVISCOPE Smart Traffic Intersection Example
 

A short video clip of an outdoor Augmented Reality animation conducted at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). This video is an animation of a traffic intersection. The operation consists of a virtual and a real car approaching the intersection from two different directions.

 

In first part, the virtual car yields to the real car and crosses the intersection only after the real car is gone. In second case, the real car waits for the virtual car to cross before it enters the intersection. This is a simple example of virtual and real object interaction in AR in which both real and virtual objects are aware of each other's location.

 

The model was simulated in a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) tool and the animation trace file and the visualization were done in ARVISCOPE Augmented Reality environment.

   

Real Time Augmented Reality Animation - ARVISCOPE Simple Earthmoving Example

 

A short video clip of an outdoor Augmented Reality animation conducted at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor).

 

This video is an animation of a simple earthmoving operation. The operation consists of an excavator which loads two haulers. The haulers dump the soil at a distant location and return to the loading area.

 

The model was simulated in a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) tool and the animation trace file and the visualization were done in ARVISCOPE Augmented Reality environment.

   

Real Time Augmented Reality Animation - ARVISCOPE Steel Structure Erection Example

 

A short video clip of an outdoor Augmented Reality animation conducted at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor).

 

This video is an animation of a steel structure erection operation. The operation consists of a tower crane which picks and places a number of beam and column sections on top of concrete foundations to build a steel structure.

 

The model was simulated in a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) tool and the animation trace file and the visualization were done in ARVISCOPE Augmented Reality environment.

   

Real Time Augmented Reality Animation - ARVISCOPE Offshore Concrete Delivery Example

 

A short video clip of an outdoor Augmented Reality animation conducted at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor).

 

This video is an animation of an offshore concrete delivery operation. The operation consists of two barges each carrying a concrete mixer truck from a location on the shore to an offshore pier on which the concrete is to be placed.

 

The model was simulated in a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) tool and

the animation trace file and the visualization were done in ARVISCOPE Augmented Reality environment.

   
Mobile Computing  
   

KEG Tracker - Indoor Positioning using Natural Markers
 

This video demonstrates the KEG tracker developed in our lab for estimating a camera's position and orientation for a general class of mobile context-aware applications. The algorithm integrates two classic natural marker-based registration algorithms, Homography-from-detection and Homography-from-tracking, and overcomes their specific limitations of jitter and drift by applying two global constraints (geometric and appearance) to prevent tracking errors from propagating between consecutive frames. The tracking algorithm achieves an increase in both stability and accuracy, while being fast enough for real-time applications.

 

 

The software and its source code can be downloaded from the software page on this website.

   

Interpretation of Fully Qualified User Spatial Context - WLAN-Based Indoor Position Tracking

 

A video clip of user position tracking in indoor environments using WLAN based triangulation. The experiment used the Ekahau Positioning Engine (EPE) and was conducted at the Construction Engineering Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

 

This application portrays how a mobile user, based on the position (X, Y and floor level) obtained from the EPE and the head orientation obtained from a magnetic tracker, is navigating inside the laboratory and inspecting objects in the surrounding space.

   

Interpretation of Fully Qualified User Spatial Context - UWB-Based Indoor Position Tracking

 

A video clip of an Ultra-Wide Band (UWB) based indoor tracking experiment conducted in the "Maze" at the former
NIKE missile base barracks building at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD.

 

This application portrays how a mobile user (e.g. an inspector or construction engineer), based on the position (X, Y, Z) obtained from the UWB tracking system and the head orientation obtained from a magnetic tracker, can navigate in a congested space and inspect objects in the surroundings while the computer interprets the spatial context.

 
   

Information Retrieval from BIM based on Interpretation of Fully Qualified User Spatial Context

 

This application portrays how a mobile user such as an inspector or construction engineer, based on the position (X, Y, Z) obtained from a indoor position tracking system and the head orientation obtained from a magnetic tracker, can navigate in a congested space while the computer automatically tracks the spatial context and prioritizes information that is relevant at that time and location.

 

A mobile user is continuously tracked for position and line of sight. Based on interpreted spatial context, the building objects in the user's view are identified. The building information model is then queried for information pertaining to the identified building objects.  

   
Virtual Reality  
   

Bridge Construction: VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

Balanced cantilever deck construction at Smart Bridge, Blacksburg, VA. This experiment depicts a simulation-driven visualization of operations involved in the construction of a bridge. The animation was developed to demonstrate VITASCOPE's core and extended animation language statements. In particular, the experiment simulated and animated the construction of a five-span, cast-in-place, balanced-cantilever, segmental concrete bridge. The specific construction processes that were modeled and animated include: 1) Excavation of pier foundations, 2) Placing concrete pier footings, 3) Casting pier shafts using modular climbing forms, 4) Casting massive pier tables, and 5) Casting the balanced-cantilever superstructure segments (box girders) using form travelers. 

 
   

Concrete Delivery: VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

Concrete delivery at Puente Chiapas. On this job, concrete manufactured at a batch plant on the shore was placed in hollow steel jackets to cast the piers of the bridge. Concrete was delivered to the workface at the piers using barges to transport concrete trucks. Concrete from each arriving truck was pumped into a hopper built on the pier's working platform. The hopper fed a tremie pipe that was lowered into each steel jacket. As the depth of placed concrete rose, a crane mounted on a floating platform withdrew sections of the tremie pipe from the jacket and placed them on racks after being cut. This procedure continued until the entire depth of the jacket was concreted.

 
   

Block Masonry: VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

Animation of block masonry construction at Harper Hall, Blacksburg, VA. This animation shows a mason and his assistant working on a wall section. This operation was modeled and animated at a very low level-of-detail. The viewer is able to observe a mason constructing a wall section by laying successive courses of individual blocks. The viewer is also able to observe the materials (blocks and mortar) being delivered to the working floor by a lift (not visible in the snapshot) and being transported to the workface by the mason's assistant.

 
   

Steel Erection: VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

Erection of structural steel frame in Vitascope. This experiment demonstrates the differences in concept, form, and content between 4D CAD and dynamic 3D visualization of operations simulations. An example of a structural steel framing operation is presented to elucidate the comparison.

 
   

Earthmoving: VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

3D animation of the classic "one-way curve" earthmoving simulation problem. This experiment demonstrates the efficacy of 3D visualization in verifying and validating discrete-event construction simulation models. The video presents a case study of a simulation model of an earthmoving operation with fairly complex control logic that was verified and validated by visualizing the operation in 3D.

 
   

AutoCIS2 with VITASCOPE Visualization System

 

AutoCIS2 implements algorithms that automatically extract the geometry, position, and orientation of steel beams and columns from a structural frame described in the CIMSteel Integration Standards (CIS/2) format. The extracted steel member geometry and pose information can be used to program installation instructions for a kinematically smart crane inside a 3D virtual world to support automated animation of simulated steel erection operations.

 
   

 

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Laboratory for Interactive Visualization in Engineering (LIVE)

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

College of Engineering, University of Michigan

2350 Hayward Street, Suite 2105 G.G. Brown Building

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125, USA